10Gb Switch Buying Guide

As the development of burgeoning network technology, 1000Base network switch has become insufficient to meet the demand. In this circumstance, 10Gb, 40Gb and even 100Gb switches are designed to cater for current and future high speed and capacity optical networks. Among them, 10Gb switch is the most popular one for both enterprise data center and carrier’s metro networks. This tutorial is a buying guide for 10Gb switch.

Overview of 10Gb Switch

Ever since 10 gigabit Ethernet has been defined by the IEEE 802.3ae standard in 2002, the ever-accelerated bandwidth intensive applications of 10Gb switches have been updating year by year. Typically it is used for interconnecting routers, servers in data centers to construct Spine-Leaf network. The reasons for boosting 10Gb switch deployments are never limited in the 10Gb speed providing. Moreover, it centralizes the pros of low latency, fewer bottlenecks, simple virtualized environment, spare bandwidth, rack space efficiency, low power consumption and expansion flexibility, etc.

FS 10Gb switch

Figure 1: FS S5850 & S5800 series 10Gb switches.

Concerns for Buying 10Gb Switch

When choosing 10Gb switch, budget is always a big concern. Generally speaking, more advanced switches with managed or PoE features will be more expensive than the opposite one. Another factor first comes in our mind is number of port. For example, 12/24/32/48 port 10Gb switches are all available at FS.COM. Table below shows the detail specification of FS S5800-48F4S 48 port SFP switch as an example for 10Gb switch.

Switching Class Layer2/3
Switching Capacity 176Gbps
Form Factor 1 RU
Latency 2.3us
Throughput 130.95Mpps
Max. Power Draw 75W
Hot-swappable Power Supplies 2 (1+1 redundancy)
Hot-swappable Fans 4 (N+1 redundancy)
CPU Cavium CN5010-500BG564-CP-G/500MHz

In addition to cost and port quantity, there are other factors to concern for buying 10Gb switch. Take a second for figuring out your network requirement and grasping the knowledge basis of 10Gb switch will save you budget and provide you superior buying experience.

·Managed or Unmanaged

Managed 10Gb switch is an advanced one for optimized network performance, which is best suitable for heavy-workload organizations requiring for traffic control, custom management and security monitoring. Unmanaged 10Gb switch is a configuration fixed plug-and-play switch. No customized management and control are supported for operators. It is best fit for anyone who just want to simply set up a network and let it run automatically. It is noted that smart partly-managed switch is a compromise solution for both functional and cost-effective concerns.

·PoE or Non-PoE

PoE 10Gb switch deploys a single cable as medium for both data transmission and power supply to PDs, such as Wireless access points, IP cameras and VoIP phones. Breaking the tether of power outlet, it can be easily placed anywhere, on desktop, on a wall or mounted in a rack. But if power supply is not a question, you can just pick up non-PoE 10Gb switch, which will save your expense.

·Stackable or Standalone

Network upgrade and expansion are common in data centers, in this case, more switches are required for connecting the growing number of devices. When deploying standalone switch, operators need to control each switch individually. Also, it is a complicated process to add new switch. Thus standalone 10Gb switch is commonly used in small business networks. For larger enterprises, stackable switch is dispensable to simplify the management and increase the availability of the network.

Ending

10Gb switch speeds your network up and provides high reliability and flexibility to your data centers. How to choose a 10Gb switch? Try to take a second for making clear the following question: What is my budget limit? How is my network environment? How many ports are in need? Is a managed or PoE switch necessary? Should I deploy a stackable switch for future-proof concern? For buying gigabit switch: 10G, 40G or even 100G, FS is always a reliable vendor to go.

Related article: Recommendations for Cheap 48-Port 10Gb Switches

24 Port Switch Recommendation

Among all the port types of Ethernet switch, the 24 port gigabit switch plays a really important role in expanding both enterprise and home network. For enterprise network, deploying several 24 port switch versus 48 port switch not only saves you money, but also provides you backup switches in network outages and separate placing flexibility. As for home network, 24 port switch offers you more spare ports for upgrade and expansion even though currently you only has less than 16 drops. This article will recommend you four 24 port switches in terms of managed or unmanaged and PoE or non-PoE for various demands.

Managed 24 Port Switch Recommendation

·Non-PoE: FS S3800-24T4S ($369)

FS S3800-24T4S 24 port gigabit stackable managed switch comes with 24 x 100/1000Base-T ports, 4 x 10GE SFP+ uplinks, 1 x console port and 2 x power supplies to allow dual power. If dual power is redundant, you can go for this mode’s single power version, which will save you 30 dollars. The switching capacity for a single S3800-24T4S switch is up to 128Gbps. Morever, the 4 SFP+ ports allow up to 4 S3800-24T4S switches stacked together as a whole. Thus proving up to 512 Gbps total switching capacity to your network and rackspace saving. It is designed to meet the demand of cost-effective gigabit access and aggregation for enterprise networks and operators. FS S3800-24T4S 24 port switch can be managed by both GUI command and web user interface, which is really user-friendly for concerns of interface as well as setting.

·PoE: FS S1400-24T4F ($399)

FS S1400-24T4F 24 port gigabit PoE+ managed switch , 400W comes with 24 x 10/100/1000Base-T RJ45 Ethernet ports, 1 x console port, 2 x combo ports and 2 x gigabit SFP (mini-GBIC) slots. This L2+ fully managed 24 port PoE switch features optimized intelligent function to improve key business application availability, sensitive data security and transmission efficiency. Besides, FS S1400-24T4F 24 port switch complies with PoE+ standard for higher power capacity than PoE standard. It is best fit for SMB, entry-level enterprise and home network to power devices such as wireless APs, IP cameras and VoIP phones.

Unmanaged 24 Port Switch Recommendation

·Non-PoE: Cisco SG112-24 ($149.95)

Cisco SG112-24 24 port unmanaged switch has 24 x 10/100/1000 ports and 2 x combo gigabit SFP ports. It is a fixed-configuration switch with auto-negotiation, auto-uplink and cable diagnostics function. For any SMBs who just need the network to run automatically, this unmanaged non-PoE rack mountable 24 port switch will be a good choice. However, it is noted that for concerns of customized setting, security control and heavy load adaptability, you should avoid this version and go for the managed one.

unmanaged 24 port switch

Figure 1: Cisco SG112-24 24 port unmanaged switch with 2 SFP ports.

·PoE :Cisco SG 110-24HP ($237)

Cisco SG 110-24HP 24 port unmanaged PoE gigabit switch comes with 12 x 10/100/1000Base ports, 12 x PoE ports and 2 x gigabit SFP ports. The 24 port PoE switch has a switching capacity of 48 Gbps and forwarding capacity of 35.7 mpps with 100W PoE power budget. The 12 PoE ports support various powered devices such as APs and IP phones. This 24 port switch is a natural fit for anyone who wants to save the configuration trouble and requires for PoE features.

unmanaged PoE 24 port switch

Figure 2: Cisco SG 110-24HP 24 port unmanaged PoE switch with 2 SFP ports.

Summary

This article is dedicated to recommend different types of 24 port gigabit switch for various demands, based on concerns of managed or unmanaged, PoE or non-PoE. It takes the managed one from FS.COM and unmanaged one from Cisco System as examples to offer reference for 24 port switch selection. Generally speaking, managed PoE one is more expensive than unmanaged non-PoE one for superior function. For most concerns of optimized performance and customization management, just go for FS managed 24 port switch, which is cost-effective with both PoE and non-PoE available.

Related article: Recommendations for 48 Port Switches