Get Further Understanding of Ethernet Switch Port Types

Have you ever noticed the ports on your gigabit PoE switch or other network switches? They may come in different port types and work on different switch port modes. The switch ports number varies from different network switches and port type can be configured according to specific needs. Then how many ports on a switch? What are the common switch port types?

How Many Ports Does a Network Switch Have?

Generally, I’d like to assort the ports on the switch into the ones that enable others to work and the ones to realize its own operation. The former may be classified into different types of ports based on their port speeds as shown in the following diagram, and the latter is referred to the console port. Almost every switch has a console port used to connect to the computer and manage the switch as the switch has no display component.

Here takes FS gigabit switch, 10GB Ethernet switch and 40G/100G Ethernet switches as examples to show the switch port types and numbers that a network switch may have.

S3800-24T4S
1GB Ethernet Switch
S5800-8TF12S
10GB Ethernet Switch
S5850-48T4Q
40GB Ethernet Switch
S5850-48S2Q4C
100GB Ethernet Switch
RJ45 port
8
8
48
/
SFP port
8
8
/
48
SFP+ port
12
12
/
/
QSFP+ port
/
/
4
2
QSFP28 port
/
/
/
4

As the above figure shows, a network switch may support diversified ports. The common port number of FS network switch is 8, 24 and 48. While the maximum number of ports in a switch can grow as demands.

Common Switch Port Types on Network Switches

When the data switch resides in a VLAN, there may be three common switch port types: access port, trunk port and hybrid port. An Ethernet interface can function as a trunk port, an access port or a hybrid port.

Switch Port Types: Access Port

Access port is used for connecting devices such as desktops, laptops, printers etc., only available in access link. A switch port in access modes belongs to one specific VLAN and sends and receives regular Ethernet frames in untagged form. Usually, an access port can only be member of one VLAN, namely the access VLAN, and it discards all frames that are not classified to the access VLAN.

Switch Port Types: Trunk Port

Trunk port is adopted among switches or between switch and upper-level devices, available in trunk link. A trunk port allows for several VLANs set up on the interface. As a result, it is able to carry traffic for numerous VLANs at the same time. Frames are marked with unique identifying tags—either 802.1Q tags or Interswitch Link (ISL) tags—when they move between switches through trunk ports. Therefore, every single frame can be directed to its designated VLAN. The trunk port is a VLAN aggregation port connected to other switch ports while the access port is the port that the switch connects to the host in the VLAN. The following picture shows their differences.

switch port types: trunk port vs. access port

Switch Port Types: Hybrid Port

Hybrid ports can be used to connect network devices, as well as user devices. It supports both untagged VLAN like access port and tagged VLAN like trunk port, and it can receive data from one or more VLANs. The hybrid ports resemble trunk ports in many ways, but they have additional port configuration features. Hybrid port can send some packets without tag to PC or IP phone, and others packets with tag to other device which can process tag.

Conclusion

Knowing the switch ports number can help you select the right switch for you. And figuring out the switch port types helps you configure your switch ports accordingly. This post introduces the three basic switch port types and their differences. Hope it will be helpful for you.

Network Switch Before or After Router?

Network switch and router are the commonly used devices in a network. With each carrying out its own duties accordingly, you can surf on the internet freely with your smart phone or computer. How to setup a network switch and router? Should the network switch be installed before router or after router is puzzling for many network newbies.

What Is Network Switch and Router?

To get clear about how to connect wireless router to switch, this part will state the function of network switch and router first. What is a switch in networking? A network switch is used to connect multiple devices such as computers, printers, IP camera and modem on the same network within a building. In this way, these devices can share information and communicate with each other.

What is a router in networking? A router is sometimes connected to a modem at one side and many other devices on the other side. Because the modem will only talk to the first computer that talks to it, the router at the position serves like a dispatcher to share the connection among all your devices. This enables all connected computers to share one single Internet connection.

Home network switch and router

Fig1. Home network diagram with switch and router

How to Setup a Network Switch and Router?

From the above introduction, we know that both the network switch and the router can be connected directly to a modem. However, when the two devices coexist, how to deploy them. Shall I connect modem to router to switch or modem to switch to router?

Modem to Router to Switch: Network Switch After Router

In most cases, you will see people put the modem first, followed by a router and then a gigabit Ethernet switch. The principle is that the modem gives the public IP address to the router, and the router assigns the private addresses to the devices connected to it, while the network switch doesn’t handle allocating IP addresses but serves as the extension of the limited ports on the router, to receive more devices. In this scenario, all your devices with private addresses are safe as they are not directly visible to the internet.

modem to router to network switch

Fig2. Modem router switch diagram

Modem to Switch to Router: Network Switch Before Router

Some people propose going from a cable modem to switch to wireless router. This seems good because all your devices on the network switch will have direct connections to your ISP. However, the truth is, your ISP does not offer multiple public IP addresses before the full transition from IPv4 to IPv6. So one or all ISP connections will likely fail and all of the devices connected to the switch would be exposed to the internet.

In a word, placing a modem to switch to router is not possible. At least not practically. Each port on the switch is a different IP address. So it doesn’t exist? Probably not unless your modem integrates the function of a router so that you can rewire and reconfigure the wireless router to set it up as access point. Seen from the outside, you indeed put a managed switch before router, however it still follows the principle that router goes before network switch.

Conclusion

Network switch before router or after router? Have you made it clear? This post has stated modem to router to switch vs modem to switch to router. Hope when you set up your network with router and switch, you can put them in the correct order according to your needs and the products themselves (the modem type). Here at FS.COM you can find various network switches including 10 gigabit switch, 40 gigabit switch and 100 gigabit switch, etc.

DWDM Vs. OTN: What’s the Difference?

As we slip further in the internet era, the internet boom pushed service providers to find a method to increase the capacity on their network in the most economical way. Therefore, two technology come into our sight: DWDM vs. OTN, the technologies that can expand existing bandwidth. To learn more about them and the difference between OTN and DWDM, this article may be of some help.

DWDM Vs. OTN: DWDM Basics

What is DWDM? DWDM stands for dense wavelength division multiplexing. It is a technology to send multiple strands of data through a single network link. In the transmitting end, there is an optical multiplexer converging two or more optical signals at different wavelengths. Whereas in the receiving end, an optical demultiplexer is used to separate the signals, and in this process it is unavoidable to cause signal loss which, however, can be mitigated by the optical amplifier. DWDM connections can therefore be used for transmitting data over long distances as it can increase bandwidth over existing fiber networks.

DWDM vs. OTN: DWDM Basics

DWDM Vs. OTN: OTN

OTN stands for optical transport network which provides a network-wide framework that adds SONET/SDH-like features like performance monitoring, fault detection, communication channels, and multiplexing hierarchy to WDM equipment. It works at Layer 1 to gather various tasks into the tunnel of WDM technology, increasing the transmission distance and capacity of fiber optics. It means that OTN frame structure combines the flexibility of SDH/SONET technology with the bandwidth expandability of DWDM, thus it can provide functionality of transport, multiplexing, routing, management, supervision, and survivability of optical channels carrying client signals.

The optical transport network is designed to deliver a transparent framework to efficiently carry diverse traffic types, which can decrease ACPEX/OPEX in networks and at the same time address dramatic shifts in traffic types. All in all, the charming of the OTN can be translated into two words: transparency and manageability.

Difference Between DWDM and OTN

DWDM is a point-to-point system while OTN, composed of optical cross-connector (OXC) and optical add/drop multiplexer (OADM), possesses functions like optical cross-ability and wavelength conversion. The OTN grows on the basis of DWDM technology with the aim of optimizing the existing resources of transportation network. In addition to providing large capacities of DWDM transmission, OTN permits the switching of different DWDM channels according to the needs of traffic.

In addition, as it has been proven that it is possible to tap a fiber optic cable and extract data streams, people have paid much more attention to data security over DWDM links. In contrast, OTN-channelized links and effective partitioning of traffic onto dedicated circuits bring a high level of privacy and security, preventing hackers who sneak in some section of the network from intercepting data or gaining access to other areas.

We can say that OTN network excels DWDM networks in its enhanced OAM, security and networking capabilities for wavelengths and standard multiplexing hierarchy and end-to-end optical transport transparency of customer traffic.

Conclusion

DWDM vs. OTN, the topic being addressed in this article, makes sense for those who want to better utilize them and is worthy of being explored further. Though there are indeed differences between OTN and DWDM, the two technologies are irreplaceable and have become the key point in the telecommunications infrastructure for regional networks as the allows bandwidth over existing networks. FS focuses on providing customers the best technical support, engineering cost effective and scalable solutions for metro and long-haul DWDM network. For more details, visit this website.

Server Rack Sizes: How to Choose a Right One?

A server rack is an equipment that holds all kinds of network devices ranging from switches, patch panel racks, to cable organizer and so on. Generally, the very first step in rack cable management is to get a container like 42U server rack to support all your devices. However, as there are so many server rack sizes on the market, how to get the one that is ideal for your application needs to be well thought of. Here we can offer some way out.

Common Server Rack Sizes

Based on different application requirements, different server rack sizes are produced. The three common types of server racks are open frame rack, rack enclosure and wall-mount rack.

Server Rack Sizes: Rack Enclosure

The rack enclosure, also known as server rack cabinet, usually comes in 40U,42U or 45U. It contains removable doors at both front and rear sides, removable side panels and adjustable vertical inside mounting rails, which provides an easy way to install and take out devices. The specially designed perforated door allows for smooth ventilation. Server rack cabinet may come in different height and depth. The height is usually represented by “U” and one U space equals to 1.75 inches. Whereas the depth refers to the distance between the front of the rack and the rear. FS.COM offers 9U server rack, 12U server rack, 42U server rack and 45U server rack. There may be server racks with 48u rack height on the market, which can accommodate as many as 24 2U devices.

server rack sizes, rack cabinet

Server Rack Sizes: Open Frame Rack

Open frame rack resembles rack enclosure in shape, but it is designed without doors or side panels. Just two or four bare rails are largely economical and leave easy access to cabling. And its common rack size is 45U. Ventilation is no longer a headache for expertise. However, it may expose all your applications to the external environment, resulting in bad appearance or even damage. Given this, open frame racks are optimal for network wiring closet and distribution frame applications that have high-density cabling.

server rack sizes, open frame rack

Server Rack Sizes: Wall-mount Rack

Wall-mount rack, the relatively small server rack fixed on the wall, is like a miniature rack enclosure. Usually, the wall-mount server rack sizes are 6U, 9U, 12U and 18U. As it doesn’t occupy the floor space as the former two, the wall-mount cabinet is spacing-saving which can be its selling point. It is suitable for your household use which does not include large and complicated equipment.

server rack sizes, wall-mount server rack

How to Choose from These Server Rack Sizes?

If you are not restricted by the space, you can choose from the rack enclosure and open frame server rack. Just calculate the required height and depth of your applications. For example, assume that you need to add 5 2U rack servers to your data center. A 12U server cabinet(21 inches) would be ideal, because 2 x 1.75 x 5 = 17.5 inches of space. The same is to the depth. Remember leaving some cabinet space for both the front and rear for future expansion and current rack cable management. Otherwise, a wall mount server rack is recommended as it is space-saving when you don’t have enough room for floor-standing cabinet. Check out the maximum weight it can hold.

Conclusion

Since the server rack is not flexible or scalable, we must plan carefully for the server rack sizes, and take into consideration the dimension and shape of server racks. As for the quality, rest assured that FS.COM offers sturdy cabinets with reasonable price. We are ready to provide you with the best solution.

Related article: Wall Mount vs Rack Mount Patch Panel

How to Use Vertical Cable Organizers for Rack Cable Management

Cable management, especially rack cable management, is a always the time-consuming and tedious job for IT network workers. Cable organizers like patch panel, 1U/2U cable managers and D-rings are commonly used by network workers in server rack cable management. Then how to use these cable organizers for rack cable management effectively? This article will explore some details for you.

Single-sided Cable Organizer in Rack Cable Management

The single-sided vertical cable organizers, also known as cable manager, are usually installed on open frame racks to organize and protect cables. As it is single-sided, the finger ducts are facing towards the front side or users. It is in most cases attached to the rack and won’t take up much room in rack cable management. The 45U single-sided cable organizer provided by FS.COM is capable of managing all the fiber and copper cables in a server rack. It is equipped with molded cable management fingers which have integral bend radius control. Each of this single-sided vertical cable manager consists of two 22.5U sections in one package. The two parts can be seamlessly combined together when they are installed along a standard 45U height server rack. The user-friendly cover on this rack cable organizer can help protect the cable from damage and dust-proof, and also hide the cables inside.

vertical cable organizer

Dual-sided Cable Organizer in Rack Cable Management

Different from the single-sided cable organizer, the dual-sided cable manager is designed with management fingers on both front and rear sides. The double-sided structure enables the maximize space utilization, which can better meet the vertical cable management need. The 45U plastic dual-sided vertical cable organizer is deployed to deal with the slack cables, preventing the chaotic cable runs. Its soft finger ducts on front and back sides allowing for quick and easy cable routing on the server racks. Two 22.5U sections being coupled seamlessly form a complete 45U dual-sided vertical cable manager which is suitable for both fiber and copper cabling. The covers on both sides can protect cables from damage and dust. It can be a good partner of horizontal cable managers. In addition, this vertical cable manager has multiple finger ducts that can store a large number of cables.

How to Use Vertical Cable Organizers for Server Racks

The vertical cable organizers are often deployed where cables run chaotically. When applying them, assemble all the gadgets including the cover and the easily inserted brackets. Use screws to fix them on the open frame rack. After the two 22.5U dual-sided cable organizers being matched seamlessly, the cable management can go on. To produce a tidy and clean appearance, care should be given that the cables on the same row should be passed through the same gaps between two fingers. Get some cable ties to achieve better effects. After the cabling, close the cover. Success. Here is a video introducing how to apply vertical cable organizers in rack cable management.

Conclusion

Vertical cable organizer, or vertical cable manager, can simplify rack cable management effectively. It has nothing to do with the network but serves the cable management. In the cabling system, only combing the cable runs clearly can the network system work in an orderly way. FS.COM has been all along working on the growing conundrum to offer you market-leading quality and novel design. We now have different cable organizers available for your reference to deal with vertical and horizontal cable management.